What is dyslexia? And how do our brains read?

Have you heard the word dyslexia before? It’s a term used to describe when people have a hard time learning to read. It’s actually very common because reading is a fairly new skill that humans have developed.
In this episode we do a deep dive on dyslexia. We’ll look at how our brains have cobbled together the ability to read by re-purposing parts of the brain that evolved for other functions. And we’ll learn what scientists think might be going on in the brains of people with dyslexia when they learn to read. We also talk to Ann Bancroft, a Polar explorer and educator who also has dyslexia, about why getting lost can be fun.
Plus we’ll hear a new Mystery Sound and find out if mice actually do love cheese in our Moment of Um. https://www.brainson.org/shows/2019/08/20/what-is-dyslexia-and-how-do-our-brains-read?fbclid=IwAR1FQ2quD_WxHlL4SARbOLBI4IEFFJeuLYr-bx6u5KfTDFO2f9n2zqH-yWQ

American Public Media

Margaret Goldberg, a teacher and literacy coach in the Oakland Unified School District, and a colleague recorded first-graders talking about what makes them good readers. In this video, Mia, on the left, was in the phonics program. Mia says she’s a good reader because she looks at the words and sounds them out. JaBrea, on the right, was taught the cueing system. JaBrea says, “I look at the pictures and I read it.” https://www.apmreports.org/story/2019/08/22/whats-wrong-how-schools-teach-reading

Cracking The CODE

Yale researchers who have studied hundreds of kindergartners for nearly 40 years say one in five was dyslexic. But perhaps their most important finding: There is no link at all between dyslexia and intelligence. Susan Spencer reports on efforts to help those with dyslexia “crack the code,” from students at a Louisiana school catering to dyslexic children, to a new law to help the high percentage of prison inmates who have dyslexia.

US Dept of Labor acknowledges FMLA for IEP’s

In response to an inquiry from a parent, the federal agency said that employees can qualify for leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act, or FMLA, if their presence at an IEP meeting is significant to their ability to provide care for their children. https://www.dol.gov/whd/opinion/FMLA/2019/2019_08_08_2A_FMLA.pdf

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